The Falklands War

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SKB
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The Falklands War

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The first three of a series of five films produced by the Imperial War Museum commemorating the 40th Anniversary of the 1982 Falklands War, which lasted between 2nd April 1982 until 10th June 1982.

1/5

(Imperial War Museum) 23rd March 2022
To the people who live there and to Britain they are the Falkland Islands but to their closest neighbour across the sea Argentina and its people, they are las Islas Malvinas. The debate over what to call the islands is a symbol of a much larger dispute which has raged for hundreds of years and continues to this day. On the Argentinian side a claim based on territorial integrity and a perceived historical injustice. And on the British side, a claim based on historical precedent and the right to self-determination.

In April of 1982, that debate became a conflict. One which would take the lives of nearly 1,000 people. But for Argentina, it was never meant to be that way. In fact, when Argentina invaded the Falkland Islands they believed that Britain wouldn't even respond.

In this first episode of our five-part Falklands series IWM Curator Carl Warner looks at why the Falklands Conflict happened. Why did Argentina believe they could take the Falklands without a fight? What was the invasion like? And why did Britain choose to fight for these islands 8,000 miles from home?
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(Imperial War Museum) 6th April 2022
On 2nd April 1982 Argentinian Marines occupied Stanley in the Falklands, in Argentina news of the invasion was met with celebrations. To General Leopaldo Galtieri all information seemed to indicate that London would not go to war over these islands. But by the 5th April, a British Task Force was already on its way. It had taken just days to fully load and equip both aircraft carriers, HMS Invincible and HMS Hermes and their escorts. They were on their way south ahead of other ships to enforce the total exclusion zone. But with the Royal Navy more prepared for cutbacks and the Cold War than a conflict 8,000 miles away, what kind of force had they been able to pull together? In fact, the Argentine Navy would be forced to withdraw just a few weeks after the arrival of the British Task force, following the sinking of the major surface combatant the General Belgrano. The Argentine focus switched to their Air Force - and with this, posed a great threat to the Royal Navy. IWM Curator Alan Jeffreys tells us more about this topic, looks at an Exocet Missile on display at IWM London and some objects that belonged to commander of a naval bomb disposal team, Nigel 'Bernie' Bruen including a scorched alarm bell from RFA Sir Tristram.
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(Imperial War Museum) 20th April 2022
When the Falklands Conflict began Argentina seemingly had a massive advantage in the skies. They had over 100 aircraft of varying types. Some could operate from the Argentinian mainland and others could operate from airstrips on the Falklands themselves. Meanwhile, the British Task Force initially had only 20 Sea Harriers which could fit on its two aircraft carriers, HMS Hermes and HMS Invincible. It was up to them to protect the Task Force at sea as well as the troops on the ground, but to many that seemed like an impossible task.

In this 3rd episode of our Falklands series IWM Curator Paris Agar examines the conflict in the air. Just how big was the Argentinian advantage? How did each side change their strategy? And how did British pilots beat the odds and take control of the skies? To answer those questions and more Agar takes an in-depth look at the aircraft of the Falklands Conflict including the Vulcan, Pucará, Wessex and Harrier.
Parts 4 & 5 to follow....
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SKB
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Re: The Falklands War

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(Forces News) 7th April 2022
Veterans have been sharing their memories of when the UK deployed a task force to the Falkland Islands 40 years ago.

In response to Argentina's invasion of the Falklands in April 1982, British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher ordered the deployment of a force including two aircraft carriers, more than 120 vessels and thousands of personnel.

It was the largest operation of its kind since the Second World War.

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Re: The Falklands War

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Part 4/5

(Imperial War Museums) 12th May 2022
On the 2nd of April 1982, Argentina occupied the Falkland Islands. Within three days, a British task force was en route to take them back.

Both sides faced formidable difficulties. The British had to transport sufficient men and material to the South Atlantic, put them ashore, and then defeat a well dug in, numerically superior enemy. But the British were experienced professional soldiers, highly trained and equipped with modern weapons. The Argentinian forces were not and the local population was not on their side.

Both sides would have to operate in freezing conditions in terrain which forced them into a form of combat which had not been seen since the Second World War - night time frontal assaults on entrenched positions, at times fighting hand to hand.

In this penultimate episode of our Falklands series, we are focusing on the climax of the conflict - the land campaign. What was each side’s strategy? What mistakes did they make? And why - despite fierce Argentinian resistance - did the British eventually come out on top? To find out, we need to go right back to the Argentinian invasion.

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Re: The Falklands War

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Anyone else pondered the similarities between the Falklands & the Ukraine war?

Fading regional power claims historical ownership of a nearby area against the wishes of local population
That invader expects the other side to give in without a fight
The invader's (conscript) soldiers are unprepared, ill-equipped and in many cases didn't know they were going
State sanctioned cruelty and torture in both cases (in FI of Argentinian troops by Argentinian leadership)

Let us hope that the defender's resolve and western weapons win in Ukraine also
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ArmChairCivvy
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Re: The Falklands War

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Enigmatically wrote: 30 May 2022, 12:14 Anyone else pondered the similarities between the Falklands & the Ukraine war?

Fading regional power claims historical ownership
Even more importantly, the leadership within the (slowly)fading regional power has lost all legitimacy
... and to stay in power, will need to raise the nationalistic fervour, over the every-day ills from their own mismanagement, felt by the wider population, but not by the clique clinging onto power
Ever-lasting truths: Multi-year budgets/ planning by necessity have to address the painful questions; more often than not the Either-Or prevails over Both-And.
If everyone is thinking the same, then someone is not thinking (attributed to Patton)

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Re: The Falklands War

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Part 5/5

(Imperial War Museums) 1st June 2022
The Falklands Conflict of 1982 only lasted for 74 days, but it had lasting consequences which continue to be felt today. Prior to 1982, Margaret Thatcher's government was planning major defence cuts including withdrawing military from the South Atlantic. Instead, they spent nearly £3 billion defending British sovereignty of the Falkland Islands, and to this day maintain a garrison there. What was the effect of this short conflict for Argentina, Britain and the Falkland Islands, and what impact did it have around the world?

Correction: The video states that Port Stanley was granted city status in 2002, this should be 2022.

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Re: The Falklands War

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RAF drew up plans to bomb Argentina during Falklands War

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2022/1 ... lands-war/

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